Humor in the Qur’an

An interesting study by Mustansir Mir. Accessible here: https://www.academia.edu/7544249/Humor_in_the_Quran Sometimes, the comical caricatures that the Qur'an paints of its opponents is evident, one cannot bring themselves to laugh because of the serious nature of the surrounding discussion. Although this description of one of the opponents of the Prophet is clearly satire - the image of … Continue reading Humor in the Qur’an

Study notes: Who wrote the books of Moses?

My study notes on Chapter 6 of 'The Old Testament: An Introduction to the Hebrew Bible' by Stephen Harris and Robert Platzner. Introduction Traditionally, the Pentateuch, or the five books of Moses, have been understood by Orthodox Jews to be the authored by Moses (this understanding of the bible is called Mosaic authorship). This view was … Continue reading Study notes: Who wrote the books of Moses?

Book review: Discovering the Qur’an – Neal Robinson

The Qur'an in translation is sometimes wrongfully described by the western reader to be lacking any coherent structure, jumping from topic to topic without making clear the link between them. The rhyme and the innate musicality is lost in translation yet is one of the things that makes the book so powerful. Furthermore, these are key to … Continue reading Book review: Discovering the Qur’an – Neal Robinson

The origins of the 5 daily Islamic prayers: Jonathan Brown on Tom Holland’s “In the Shadow of the Sword”

In light of my recent posts and research interests, this could not come more timely: An article written by Jonathan Brown on Holland's ideas on the origins of Islamic ritual practice of the Salaat, or the five daily prayers that Muslims. Brown is a published scholar on the authenticity of Hadith and other related topics. I highly recommend … Continue reading The origins of the 5 daily Islamic prayers: Jonathan Brown on Tom Holland’s “In the Shadow of the Sword”

Abraha, the year of the elephant, and the location of Mecca in Tom Holland’s “In the Shadow of the Sword”

So I've finished reading Holland's book on the origins of Islam and I have to say I am not very impressed. I've revised my goals a bit and I will no longer be doing a point-by-point refutation of his book since much (as Holland himself admits) is speculatory, far too broad to refute directly and simply … Continue reading Abraha, the year of the elephant, and the location of Mecca in Tom Holland’s “In the Shadow of the Sword”

A new Arabic papyrus dating within 12 years of the Prophet Muhammad

بسم الله In 2014 Islamic historian Fred Donner gave a talk on an very curious papyrus page dating from the very early Islamic era. The letter is of tremendous interest for reasons I will mention in this post. Papyrus E17861 The text is a personal letter talking about the distribution of a sum of money among relatives. It … Continue reading A new Arabic papyrus dating within 12 years of the Prophet Muhammad