Book review: Structure and Qur’anic Interpretation

This is an interesting albeit short book by Raymond Farrin exploring the structure of the Qur'anic text. Farrin prefaces the text by saying that the Qur'an is unfortunately not well appreciated by much of the English audience, as both its dynamic style and a structure that does not follow modern styles of composition seems alien … Continue reading Book review: Structure and Qur’anic Interpretation

I want the Study Qur’an

I don't understand what the whole fuss is about. Imagine this: 2000 pages worth of Qur'an and its exegesis that looks at interpretations of not only the orthodox Sunni exegetes but also of all other sects, including the Khawarij and the Mu'tazila. That in itself makes accessible discourse that was previously unreachable to all but specialists. … Continue reading I want the Study Qur’an

Humor in the Qur’an

An interesting study by Mustansir Mir. Accessible here: https://www.academia.edu/7544249/Humor_in_the_Quran Sometimes, the comical caricatures that the Qur'an paints of its opponents is evident, one cannot bring themselves to laugh because of the serious nature of the surrounding discussion. Although this description of one of the opponents of the Prophet is clearly satire - the image of … Continue reading Humor in the Qur’an

Study notes: Who wrote the books of Moses?

My study notes on Chapter 6 of 'The Old Testament: An Introduction to the Hebrew Bible' by Stephen Harris and Robert Platzner. Introduction Traditionally, the Pentateuch, or the five books of Moses, have been understood by Orthodox Jews to be the authored by Moses (this understanding of the bible is called Mosaic authorship). This view was … Continue reading Study notes: Who wrote the books of Moses?

Book review: Discovering the Qur’an – Neal Robinson

The Qur'an in translation is sometimes wrongfully described by the western reader to be lacking any coherent structure, jumping from topic to topic without making clear the link between them. The rhyme and the innate musicality is lost in translation yet is one of the things that makes the book so powerful. Furthermore, these are key to … Continue reading Book review: Discovering the Qur’an – Neal Robinson

The origins of the 5 daily Islamic prayers: Jonathan Brown on Tom Holland’s “In the Shadow of the Sword”

In light of my recent posts and research interests, this could not come more timely: An article written by Jonathan Brown on Holland's ideas on the origins of Islamic ritual practice of the Salaat, or the five daily prayers that Muslims. Brown is a published scholar on the authenticity of Hadith and other related topics. I highly recommend … Continue reading The origins of the 5 daily Islamic prayers: Jonathan Brown on Tom Holland’s “In the Shadow of the Sword”